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Illinois Licensing Requirements for Barbering

Each applicant must meet the following requirements:

  1. Is at least 16 years of age.
  2. Has graduated from a high school or equivalent.
  3. Has graduated from a school of barbering or school of cosmetology approved by the Department, having completed a total of 1500 hours in the study of barbering extending over a period of not less than 9 months nor more than 3 years. A school of barbering may, at its discretion, consistent with the rules of the Department, accept up to 500 hours of cosmetology school training at a recognized cosmetology school toward the 1500 hour course requirement of barbering. Time spent in such study under the laws of another state or territory of the United States or of a foreign country or province shall be credited toward the period of study required by the provisions of this paragraph.
  4. Has passed an examination caused to be conducted by the Department or its designated testing service to determine fitness to receive a license as a barber.
  5. Has met any other requirements of this Act.

Safety Requirements: The practice of barbering involves the use of sharp implements as well as chemicals that could be hazardous. Attention to proper safety procedures, which protect both client and technician, are very important, and will be taught during the course.

Physical Demands: The physical demands for a barber are primarily the extensive use of the hands for salon services and the long periods of standing which are required for the services.

Compensation: A study conducted for the National Accrediting Commission of Cosmetology Arts and Sciences, Job Demand in the Cosmetology Industry, 2007, found that the total number of salons is up 18.3% and number of salon professionals is up 5%. The number of chairs or workstations is unchanged at 5.1% and the number of employees leaving their positions is down 13%. Nearly 40% of all new positions were filled by inexperienced workers.

This national survey also found that 53% of salon owners reported that they had job openings. The average salon income, including tips, is about $30,000 - $48,000/year. When a person graduates with a barber license, they are qualified to be a hair stylist, hair color specialist, platform artist, product company representative, salon owner/manager and more. Barbers may choose to work in a salon, independently or as booth rental contractors. Most barbers work on commission, so earnings vary depending on the length of time in the business, and the ability to build and retain clientele. A fun and successful career is in your future!

NACCAS Completion Rates: As reported in our most recent accreditation annual report, out of 153 students scheduled to graduate in 2019, 109 graduated within 150% of the scheduled course time, or 71%. Out of the 153 students scheduled to graduate in 2019, 44 students did not complete the program. A four-year average graduation rate for all USCA programs, 2016-2019 is 67%. For the Classic Barbering program, 18 students were scheduled to graduate in 2019, 10 graduated within 150% of the scheduled course time, or 56%. Out of the 18 students scheduled to graduate in 2019, 8 students did not complete the program.

NACCAS Licensing Exam Pass/Fail Rates: Out of 100 graduates who took the exam in 2019, 94 passed, or 94%. A four-year average for 2016-2019, for all USCA programs, was 96%. For the Classic Barbering program, 7 graduates who took the exam in 2019, 4 passed, or 57%.

NACCAS Placement Rates: Out of 109 graduates in 2019, 86 responded to surveys that they had found a job in their field, or 79%. Others did not respond to the survey. A four-year average for 2016-2019, is 80%. For the Classic Barbering program, out of the 10 graduates in 2019, 8 responded to surveys that they had found a job in their field, or 80%.

State Educational Requirements

The institution has determined that its curriculum meets the State educational requirements for licensure or certification to the following states:

Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming

The institution has determined that its curriculum does not meet the State educational requirements for licensure or certification to the following states:

Alaska, Michigan, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, Ohio

The institution has not determined that its curriculum does not meet the State educational requirements for licensure or certification to the following states:

Iowa, Minnesota, South Dakota

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Illinois Licensing Requirements for Cosmetology

Each applicant must meet the following requirements:

  1. Is at least 16 years of age.
  2. Has graduated from a high school or equivalent.
  3. Has graduated from a cosmetology school approved by the Department having completed 1500 hours in the study of cosmetology extending over a period of not less than 8 months, no more than 7 consecutive years. A school may, at its discretion, consistent with the rules of the department, accept up to 500 hours of barber school training at a recognized barber school towards the 1500 hour course requirements of cosmetology. Time spent in such study under the laws of another state or territory of the United States or of a foreign country or province shall be credited toward the period of study required by the provisions of this paragraph.
  4. Has passed an examination authorized by the Department to determine fitness to receive a license as a cosmetologist. The requirements for remedial training set forth by the Department may be waived in whole or in part by the Department upon proof to the Department that the applicant has demonstrated competence to again sit for the examination. The Department shall promulgate rules establishing the standards by which such determination shall be made.
  5. Has met any other requirements of this Act.

Safety Requirements: The practice of cosmetology involves the use of sharp implements as well as chemicals that could be hazardous. Attention to proper safety procedures, which protect both client and technician, are very important, and will be taught during the course.

Physical Demands: The physical demands for a cosmetologist are primarily the extensive use of the hands for salon services and the long periods of standing which are required for the services.

Compensation: A study conducted for the National Accrediting Commission of Cosmetology Arts and Sciences, Job Demand in the Cosmetology Industry, 2007, found that the total number of salons is up 18.3% and number of salon professionals is up 5%. The number of chairs or workstations is unchanged at 5.1% and the number of employees leaving their positions is down 13%. Nearly 40% of all new positions were filled by inexperienced workers.

This national survey also found that 53% of salon owners reported that they had job openings. The average salon income, including tips, is about $30,000 - $48,000/year. When a person graduates with a cosmetology license, they are qualified to be a hair stylist, hair color specialist, skin care specialist, nail technician, salon owner/manager and more. Cosmetologists may choose to work in a salon, independently or as booth rental contractors. Most cosmetologists work on commission, so earnings vary depending on the length of time in the business, and the ability to build and retain clientele. A fun and successful career is in your future!

NACCAS Completion Rates: As reported in our most recent accreditation annual report, out of 153 students scheduled to graduate in 2019, 109 graduated within 150% of the scheduled course time, or 71%. Out of the 153 students scheduled to graduate in 2019, 44 students did not complete the program. A four-year average graduation rate for all USCA programs, 2016-2019 is 67%. For the Cosmetology program, 78 students were scheduled to graduate in 2019, 53 graduated within 150% of the scheduled course time, or 68%. Out of the 78 students scheduled to graduate in 2019, 25 students did not complete the program.

NACCAS Licensing Exam Pass/Fail Rates: Out of 100 graduates who took the exam in 2019, 94 passed, or 94%. A four-year average for 2016-2019, for all USCA programs, was 96%. For the Cosmetology program, 51 graduates who took the exam in 2019, 50 passed, or 98%.

NACCAS Placement Rates: Out of 109 graduates in 2019, 86 responded to surveys that they had found a job in their field, or 79%. Others did not respond to the survey. A four-year average for 2016-2019, is 80%. For the Cosmetology program, out of the 53 graduates in 2019, 44 responded to surveys that they had found a job in their field, or 83%.

State Educational Requirements

The institution has determined that its curriculum meets the State educational requirements for licensure or certification to the following states:

Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Virginia

The institution has determined that its curriculum does not meet the State educational requirements for licensure or certification to the following states:

Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, South Carolina, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming

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Illinois Licensing Requirements for Estheticians

Each applicant must meet the following requirements:

  1. Is at least 16 years of age.
  2. Has graduated from a high school or equivalent.
  3. Has graduated from a cosmetology or esthetics school approved by the Department having completed 750 hours in the study of esthetics extending over a period of not less than 18 weeks, nor more than 4 consecutive years.
  4. Has passed an examination authorized by the Department to determine fitness to receive a license as a licensed esthetician.
  5. Has met any other requirements of this Act.

Safety Requirements: The practice of esthiology (esthetics) involves the use of sharp implements as well as chemicals that could be hazardous. Attention to proper safety procedures, which protect both client and technician, are very important, and will be taught during the course.

Physical Demands: The physical demands for an esthetician are primarily the extensive use of the hands for facial manipulation and application of skin care products, and related massage services to the face.

Compensation: A study conducted for the National Accrediting Commission of Cosmetology Arts and Sciences, Job Demand in the Cosmetology Industry, 2007, found that the total number of salons is up 18.3% and number of salon professionals is up 5%. The number of chairs or workstations is unchanged at 5.1% and the number of employees leaving their positions is down 13%. Nearly 40% of all new positions were filled by inexperienced workers.

This national survey also found that 53% of salon owners reported that they had job openings. The average salon income, including tips, is about $30,000 - $48,000/year. A license in esthetics offers you many career opportunities, such as: facialist, skin care technician, make-up artist, salon manager or owner. Estheticians may choose to work in a salon setting, independently or as booth rental contractors. Most estheticians work on commission, so earnings vary depending on the length of time in the business, and the ability to build and retain clientele. Many salons offer guaranteed salary to start with benefit packages, including insurance, retirement, vacation pay, and bonuses. Increased earnings are also available in salons where management-level positions are available. A fun and successful career is in your future!

NACCAS Completion Rates: As reported in our most recent accreditation annual report, out of 153 students scheduled to graduate in 2019, 109 graduated within 150% of the scheduled course time, or 71%. Out of the 153 students scheduled to graduate in 2019, 44 students did not complete the program. A four-year average graduation rate for all USCA programs, 2016-2019 is 67%. For the Esthiology program, 24 students were scheduled to graduate in 2019, 19 graduated within 150% of the scheduled course time, or 79%. Out of the 24 students scheduled to graduate in 2019, 5 students did not complete the program.

NACCAS Licensing Exam Pass/Fail Rates: Out of 100 graduates who took the exam in 2019, 94 passed, or 94%. A four-year average for 2016-2019, for all USCA programs, was 96%. For the Esthiology program, 17 graduates who took the exam in 2019, 16 passed, or 94%.

NACCAS Placement Rates: Out of 109 graduates in 2019, 86 responded to surveys that they had found a job in their field, or 79%. Others did not respond to the survey. A four-year average for 2016-2019, is 80%. For the Esthiology program, out of the 19 graduates in 2019, 14 responded to surveys that they had found a job in their field, or 74%.

State Educational Requirements

The institution has determined that its curriculum meets the State educational requirements for licensure or certification to the following states:

Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming

The institution has determined that its curriculum does not meet the State educational requirements for licensure or certification to the following states:

Alabama, Georgia, Kansas, Kentucky, Ohio

The institution has not determined that its curriculum does not meet the State educational requirements for licensure or certification to the following states:

Connecticut

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Illinois Licensing Requirements for Nail Technicians

Each applicant must meet the following requirements:

  1. Is at least 16 years of age.
  2. Has graduated from a high school or equivalent.
  3. Has graduated from a cosmetology or nail technology school approved by the Department having completed 350 hours in the study of nail technology extending over a period of not less than 8 weeks, nor more than 2 consecutive years and including the following: (a) theory, (b) manicuring and pedicuring, (c) nail treatment, (d) sanitary rules and sterilization, and (e) related electives.
  4. Has passed an examination authorized by the Department to determine fitness to receive a license as a nail technician.
  5. Has met any other requirements of this Act.

Safety Requirements: The practice of nail technology involves the use of sharp implements as well as chemicals that could be hazardous. Attention to proper safety procedures, which protect both client and technician, are very important, and will be taught during the course.

Physical Demands: The physical demands for a nail technician are primarily the extensive use of the hands for manicuring and related massage services, and the exposure to inhaled chemicals that may be used in application of artificial nails.

Compensation: A study conducted for the National Accrediting Commission of Cosmetology Arts and Sciences, Job Demand in the Cosmetology Industry, 2007, found that the total number of salons is up 18.3% and number of salon professionals is up 5%. The number of chairs or workstations is unchanged at 5.1% and the number of employees leaving their positions is down 13%. Nearly 40% of all new positions were filled by inexperienced workers.

This national survey also found that 53% of salon owners reported that they had job openings. The average salon income, including tips, is about $30,000 - $48,000/year. While nail technicians only make up 9.7% of the current industry employees, nearly 18% of the job openings are in this area. A license in nail technology offers you many career opportunities, such as: nail technician, manicurist, pedicurist, school instructor, salon owner/manager, sales representative, and more. Nail technicians may choose to work in a salon setting, independently or as booth rental contractors. Most nail technicians work on commission, so earnings vary depending on the length of time in the business, and the ability to build and retain clientele. Many salons offer guaranteed salary to start with benefit packages, including insurance, retirement, vacation pay, and bonuses. A fun and successful career is in your future!

NACCAS Completion Rates: As reported in our most recent accreditation annual report, out of 153 students scheduled to graduate in 2019, 109 graduated within 150% of the scheduled course time, or 71%. Out of the 153 students scheduled to graduate in 2019, 44 students did not complete the program. A four-year average graduation rate for all USCA programs, 2016-2019 is 67%. For the Nail Technology program, 25 students were scheduled to graduate in 2019, 22 graduated within 150% of the scheduled course time, or 88%. Out of the 25 students scheduled to graduate in 2019, 3 students did not complete the program.

NACCAS Licensing Exam Pass/Fail Rates: Out of 100 graduates who took the exam in 2019, 94 passed, or 94%. A four-year average for 2016-2019, for all USCA programs, was 96%. For the Nail Technology program, 20 graduates who took the exam in 2019, 19 passed, or 95%.

NACCAS Placement Rates: Out of 109 graduates in 2019, 86 responded to surveys that they had found a job in their field, or 79%. Others did not respond to the survey. A four-year average for 2016-2019, is 80%. For the Nail Technology program, out of the 22 graduates in 2019, 15 responded to surveys that they had found a job in their field, or 68%.

State Educational Requirements

The institution has determined that its curriculum meets the State educational requirements for licensure or certification to the following states:

Alaska, Delaware, Florida, Hawaii, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Utah, Virginia, Wisconsin

The institution has determined that its curriculum does not meet the State educational requirements for licensure or certification to the following states:

Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Missouri, Nevada, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Washington, West Virginia, Wyoming

The institution has not determined that its curriculum does not meet the State educational requirements for licensure or certification to the following states:

Connecticut

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Illinois Licensing Requirements for Instructors

Each applicant must meet the following requirements:

  1. Is at least 16 years of age.
  2. Has graduated from high school or equivalent.
  3. Has graduated from a cosmetology, nail technology, or esthiology school approved by the Department having completed 1500 hours in the study of cosmetology, 750 hours in the study of esthiology, or 350 hours in the study of nail technology and has passed an examination authorized by the Department to determine fitness to receive a license as a cosmetologist, nail technician, or esthetician.
  4. Has graduated from a Department approved school having completed 500 hours (cosmetology, nail technology, or esthiology instructor), 1000 hours (cosmetology instructor), 625 hours (nail technology instructor), or 750 hours (esthiology instructor).
  5. Has passed an examination authorized by the Department to determine fitness to receive a license as an instructor.
  6. Has met any other requirements of this Act.

Safety Requirements: The practice of cosmetology, nail technology, and esthiology involves the use of sharp implements as well as chemicals that could be hazardous. Attention to proper safety procedures, which protect both client and technician, are very important, and will be taught during the course.

Physical Demands: The physical demands for instructors are primarily the extensive use of the hands and the long periods of standing which are required for some services.

Compensation: A study conducted for the National Accrediting Commission of Cosmetology Arts and Sciences, Job Demand in the Cosmetology Industry, 2007, found that the total number of salons is up 18.3% and number of salon professionals is up 5%. The number of chairs or workstations is unchanged at 5.1% and the number of employees leaving their positions is down 13%. Nearly 40% of all new positions were filled by inexperienced workers.

This national survey also found that 53% of salon owners reported that they had job openings. The average salon income, including tips, is about $30,000 - $48,000/year. When a person graduates with a cosmetology license, they are qualified to be a hair stylist, hair color specialist, skin care specialist, nail technician, salon owner/manager and more. Cosmetologists may choose to work in a salon, independently or as booth rental contractors. Most cosmetologists work on commission, so earnings vary depending on the length of time in the business, and the ability to build and retain clientele. A fun and successful career is in your future!

NACCAS Completion Rates: As reported in our most recent accreditation annual report, out of 153 students scheduled to graduate in 2019, 109 graduated within 150% of the scheduled course time, or 71%. Out of the 153 students scheduled to graduate in 2019, 44 students did not complete the program. A four-year average graduation rate for all USCA programs, 2016-2019 is 67%. For the Teacher Training program, 1 student was scheduled to graduate in 2019, 1 graduated within 150% of the scheduled course time, or 100%. Out of the 1 student scheduled to graduate in 2019, 0 students did not complete the program.

NACCAS Licensing Exam Pass/Fail Rates: Out of 100 graduates who took the exam in 2019, 94 passed, or 94%. A four-year average for 2016-2019, for all USCA programs, was 96%. For the Teacher Training program, 1 graduate who took the exam in 2019, 1 passed, or 100%.

NACCAS Placement Rates: Out of 109 graduates in 2019, 86 responded to surveys that they had found a job in their field, or 79%. Others did not respond to the survey. A four-year average for 2016-2019, is 80%. For the Teacher Training program, out of the 1 graduate in 2019, 1 responded to surveys that they had found a job in their field, or 100%.

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Illinois Licensing Requirements for Massage

Each applicant must meet the following requirements in order to qualify for a license in Illinois:

  1. The applicant has applied in writing on the prescribed forms and has paid the required fees.
  2. The applicant is at least 18 years of age and of good moral character. In determining good moral character, the Department may take into consideration conviction of any crime under the laws of the United States or any state or territory thereof that is a felony or a misdemeanor or any crime that is directly related to the practice of the profession. Such a conviction shall not operate automatically as a complete bar to a license, except in the case of any conviction for prostitution, rape, or sexual misconduct, or where the applicant is a registered sex offender.
  3. The applicant has met one of the following requirements:(A) has successfully completed the curriculum or curriculums of one or more massage therapy schools approved by the Department that require a minimum of 500 hours and has passed a competency examination approved by the Department; (B) holds a current license from another jurisdiction having licensure requirements that meet or exceed those defined within this Act; or (C) has moved to Illinois from a jurisdiction with no licensure requirement and has provided documentation that he or she has successfully passed the National Certification Board of Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork's examination or another massage therapist certifying examination approved by the Department and maintains current certification.

Safety Requirements: The practice of massage therapy involves the use of implements as well as chemicals that could be hazardous. Attention to proper safety procedures, which protect both client and technician, are very important, and will be taught during the course.

Physical Demands: The physical demands for a massage therapist are primarily the extensive use of the hands for body manipulation related to massage services and the application of skin care products.

Compensation: Did you know Americans spend three to four times as much for salon services as they do for clothing? A recent study conducted for the National Accrediting Commission of Cosmetology Arts and Sciences, Job Demand in the Cosmetology Industry, 2007 found this, and many other important facts to be true. Due to an increasing client base, salons are presently experiencing a severe shortage of workers. A license in massage therapy offers you many career opportunities, such as: massage therapist, spa therapist, body treatment specialist, health club therapist, medical facility or medi-spa technician, and salon/spa manager or owner. Massage Therapists may choose to work in a salon setting, independently or as booth rental contractors. Most massage therapists work on commission, so earnings vary depending on the length of time in the business, and the ability to build and retain clientele. Many salons offer guaranteed salary to start, often $7.00 or more per hour, with benefit packages, including insurance, retirement, vacation pay, and bonuses. Increased earnings are also available in salons where management-level positions are available. Massage Therapists are in demand. A fun and successful career is in your future!

NACCAS Completion Rates: Out of 7 students scheduled to graduate in 2019, 4 graduated within 150% of the scheduled course time, or 57%. Out of the 7 students scheduled to graduate in 2019, 3 students did not complete the program.

NACCAS Licensing Exam Pass/Fail Rates: Out of 4 graduates who took the exam in 2019, 4 passed, for a pass rate of 100%.

NACCAS Placement Rates: Out of 4 graduates in 2019, 4 responded to surveys that they had found a job in their field, or 100% responded that they found jobs.

State Educational Requirements

The institution has determined that its curriculum meets the State educational requirements for licensure or certification to the following states:

Arkansas, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Jersey, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin

The institution has determined that its curriculum does not meet the State educational requirements for licensure or certification to the following states:

Alabama, Arizona, California, Delaware, Maryland, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Ohio

The institution has not determined that its curriculum does not meet the State educational requirements for licensure or certification to the following states:

Alaska, Colorado, Kansas, Kentucky, Minnesota, Oklahoma, Vermont, Wyoming

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This is your notice that institutional and financial aid information is available to you by calling or visiting this school’s Admissions Office, located at 2913 W. White Oaks Drive, Springfield, Illinois 62704, (217) 753.8990. You may also email your requests to info@uscart.com. This notice is handed out annually to all students.

Students are provided required disclosures through the following sources:

  • The school website: www.uscart.com
  • Postings on the school bulletin board in the break room
  • Annual distributions to each student every January, such as this one
  • In your Orientation book, the week before you started school

Disclosures we provide include: student financial aid information (see website and course catalogue), facilities/services available to students with disabilities (see website and course catalogue), student body diversity (including gender and race, in our orientation book and by request in our office), price of attendance (includes tuition, registration fee, books, kits, room and board equivalent, transportation and miscellaneous costs by request in our office), net price calculator (see website), refund policy (see website and course catalogue), requirements for withdrawal and return of Title IV, HEA financial aid (see website and course catalogue), academic programs (see website and course catalogue), accreditation and licensure (see website and course catalogue), copyright infringement policies and sanctions including computer use and file sharing (see your orientation book and annual handout), textbook information (see website), voter registration (annual handout), code of conduct for loans (see website), retention rate/completion rate (disaggregated)/placement in employment rate (orientation book and by request in our office), drug and alcohol abuse prevention program (see website and annual handout), crime statistics (see website and annual handout) and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and your right to refuse to have directory-type information disclosed (website, orientation book and annual handout).

A student may have access to the information in their file. This right also applies to parents (per FERPA guidelines). Students or eligible parents (per FERPA) have the right to view all of the student’s education records, including financial records. Schools are not required to provide copies of records, unless special circumstances are such that parents may not be able to visit the school. When copies are provided, USCA will charge $1.00 per page.

Students currently enrolled may review their file information, by appointment, with the School Director or Business Office staff. For students who have dropped or graduate, an appointment with the School Director or Business Office staff is required. The appointment must be during business hours, and 24 hours notice is appreciated. No documents from the student’s file may leave the school premises.

Student file information is maintained by the school for the length of time required by relevant government agencies; that is, Department of Education for financial aid records; Illinois Department of Professional Regulation for attendance, grade and related information. However, all file information is maintained for a minimum of three years.

By October 1st of each year the school’s campus security report and campus crime report will be posted in the break room for all to view. This report contains information on emergency responses, timely warning and statistics on various crimes and whether or not they occurred on campus or on neighboring properties. A paper copy will be provided to you upon request. This report is provided to all prospective students in their orientation books and to employees prior to hire.

Students may download a voter registration form at the following web address: http:// www.elections.state.il.us

To Transfer Schools:

The transfer of a student’s hours, grades, and financial aid information is processed upon written request from the student or the school to which the student is transferring (for students who have dropped from USCA). Hours are released only when a student has paid tuition and fees equal to the amount that USCA has calculated as earned; if a student has a balance due, hours will not be transferred. For a transfer of hours and grades, a written request from the student is required, along with the fee stated in the student’s contract. Transfer paperwork is usually completed within 2-3 business days.

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USCA & USMT promise to:

  1. Ban revenue-sharing arrangements with any lender.
  2. Ban contracting arrangements.
  3. Ban staffing assistance.
  4. Ensure that the institution’s employees will not receive any gift, including travel gifts, of more than nominal value from any lender, servicer, or guaranty agency.
  5. Not request or accept any payments or benefits of any kind from a lender in exchange for being included on a preferred or recommended lender list or in exchange for the school recommending the lender to its students/parents.
  6. Ban advisory board compensation with the exception of reimbursement for reasonable expenses incurred.
  7. Prohibit offers of funds for private loans, including the request for or acceptance of funds for offers of private loans to students or parents.
  8. Prohibit steering borrowers to particular lenders or delaying loan certifications.
  9. Protect the borrower’s choice of lenders.
  10. Base lists of preferred, recommended, or suggested lenders, solely, on the best interests of the student or parent borrowers, considering factors such as interest rates, fees, and loan benefits provided by the lender to the borrower.
  11. Clearly and fully disclose to students and parents the criteria and process used to select the lenders for preferred, recommended, or suggested lender lists and to clearly and fully disclose any promises or offers relating to the terms of the loans or any services to borrowers that your organization made to be included on the list.
  12. Ensure that employees of lenders who make loans to students or their parents do not identify themselves as employees of the institution of higher education and that employees or agents of a lender, servicer, or guaranty agency do not work in or provide staffing to an institution’s financial aid office unless they do so at fair market value.
  13. Restrict the use of the Department’s National Student Loan Data System to authorized personnel and for authorized purposes only.

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University of Spa & Cosmetology Arts
University of Spa & Massage Therapy
Policy Regarding a Student's Right to Privacy

A student's right to privacy is very important!

  1. Any requests for information about a student, whether for enrollment information, or any other information about a student, should be given to the School Director.
  2. Before any information is released, the student must give written permission on the appropriate permission form, in the Director’s office, for the specific information and for the person who is requesting the information. Under current regulations, all rights of parents under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA), including the right to inspect and review education records, to seek to have education records amended in certain circumstances, and to consent to the disclosure of education records, transfer to the student once the student has reached 18 years of age or attends a postsecondary institution and thereby becomes an “eligible student.” Current regulations also provide that even after a student has become an “eligible student” under FERPA, postsecondary institutions may allow parents to have access to their child’s education records, without the student’s consent, in the following circumstances: 1) the disclosure is in connection with a health or safety emergency under the conditions specified in § 99.36 (i.e., if knowledge of the information is necessary to protect the health or safety of the student or other individuals (§ 99.31(a)(10))); and 2) for postsecondary students, the student has violated any Federal, State or local law, or any rule or policy of the institution, governing the use or possession of alcohol or a controlled substance, if the institution determines that the student has committed a disciplinary violation regarding that use or possession and the student is under 21 at the time of the disclosure (§ 9.31(a)(15)).
  3. In addition, a student’s educational records may be disclosed, without their consent, to certain parties including, but not limited to, schools to which a student is transferring, colleges and universities with which we have credit-hour agreements, certain government officials, accrediting organizations and others as listed in FERPA. These information requests are to be handled by the School Director only.
  4. From time to time, the school may disclose, without consent, directory-type information such as a student’s name, address, telephone number, email address, photograph, date and place of birth, honors and awards, enrollment status, dates of attendance, availability for a clinic floor appointment and student identification number (an i.d. number that only the student and school officials recognize). Social security numbers are not considered directory-type information. It has been the practice of USCA/USMT to use only the following items as directory-type information: name, photograph, honors and awards, enrollment status, dates of attendance, availability for a clinic floor appointment and student identification number. The student (or eligible parent) may request that this information not be disclosed. This is our notice to you, the student, to advise us within ten days (of the date you are provided with this notice) if you do not want to have this disclosed.

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August 21, 2021

USCA’s Director of Admissions & Financial Aid, Amy Pruitt, prepares this report annually in compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act. Included in the crime statistics are any campus reports of criminal offenses, hate crimes and arrests or referrals for disciplinary action.

  1. This annual security report and the Crime Statistics Table are distributed to all enrolling students in the Orientation book that they receive prior to starting school. In addition, this is posted year-round in the student break room along with the Crime Statistics Table.
    • A statement of current campus policies regarding procedures and facilities for students and others to report criminal actions or other emergencies occurring on campus and policies concerning the institution's response to such reports. “USCA/USMT’s procedure for reporting criminal actions or other emergencies is as follows: We encourage students, faculty and customers to promptly report any emergency and criminal activity in an accurate and timely manner to the appropriate law enforcement agency. In addition to calling 911, criminal actions or other emergencies should be reported to the nearest instructor and also to the School Director of Admissions & Financial Aid, Amy Pruitt, or the School Owner, Gail Lorenzini, as soon as possible. The Director and/or Owner will immediately confirm that the appropriate medical or police back up has been contacted by contacting 911 themselves, should the situation be deemed to warrant that call.”
    • A statement of current policies concerning security and access to campus facilities, including campus residences, and security considerations used in the maintenance of campus facilities. “USCA/USMT’s policy regarding security and access to the school campus is as follows: The school building is the only facility that is regarded as “campus”. No housing is included. There are no off-campus locations. The school building is open during regular hours for classes, and shortly before and after to accommodate student’s arrival and departure. At any other time, the building is to be locked, and accessible only to faculty and janitors who have keys. School ownership arranges for subcontractors to replace lights, pick up debris, etc., as necessary and during normal school hours.”
    • A statement of current policies concerning campus law enforcement, including—
      • the law enforcement authority of campus security personnel;
      • the working relationship of campus security personnel with State and local law enforcement agencies, including whether the institution has agreements with such agencies, such as written memoranda of understanding, for the investigation of alleged criminal offenses; and
      • policies which encourage accurate and prompt reporting of all crimes to the campus police and the appropriate law enforcement agencies, when the victim of such crime elects or is unable to make such a report. “USCA/USMT’s policy regarding campus law enforcement is: The campus does not have its own hired law enforcement or any agreements with local law enforcement. USCA/USMT uses city, county and state law enforcement personnel if and when an emergency arises. We encourage students, faculty and customers to promptly report any emergency and criminal activity in an accurate and timely manner to the appropriate law enforcement agency.”
    • A description of the type and frequency of programs designed to inform students and employees about campus security procedures and practices and to encourage students and employees to be responsible for their own security and the security of others.
      “USCA/USMT publishes this annual security report and the Crime Statistics Table and distributes it to all enrolling students in the Orientation book that they receive. In addition, this report is posted year-round in the student break room along with the Crime Statistics Table. USCA/USMT has an annual emergency preparedness drill in October in addition to an annual presentation on personal safety to educate students and staff about security awareness, crime prevention and sexual assault programs.”
    • A description of programs designed to inform students and employees about the prevention of crimes. “USCA/USMT has an annual emergency preparedness drill in October in addition to an annual presentation on personal safety to educate students and staff about security awareness, crime prevention and sexual assault programs. We inform students at Orientation that they are advised to use the lockers the school provides to secure their personal belonging or purchase locks for their bags if they choose to leave those around the campus unattended. Finally, the school has pamphlets in our restrooms year-round that list agencies and sources of help.”
    • Statistics concerning the occurrence on campus, in or on noncampus buildings or property, and on public property during the most recent calendar year, and during the 2 preceding calendar years for which data are available--
      • of the following criminal offenses reported to campus security authorities or local police agencies:
        • murder;
        • sex offenses, forcible or nonforcible;
        • robbery;
        • aggravated assault;
        • burglary;
        • motor vehicle theft;
        • manslaughter;
        • arson;
        • arrests or persons referred for campus disciplinary action for liquor law violations, drug-related violations, and weapons possession; and
      • of the crimes described in subclauses (I) through (VIII) of clause (i), of larceny-theft, simple assault, intimidation, and destruction, damage, or vandalism of property, and of other crimes involving bodily injury to any person, in which the victim is intentionally selected because of the actual or perceived race, gender, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity, ethnicity, or disability of the victim that are reported to campus security authorities or local police agencies, which data shall be collected and reported according to category of prejudice; and
      • of domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking incidents that wer reported to campus security authorities or local police agencies.
        “USCA/USMT publishes the annual Crime Statistics Table (attached) responding to each item listed in Section (F).”
    • A statement of policy concerning the monitoring and recording through local police agencies of criminal activity at off-campus student organizations which are recognized by the institution and that are engaged in by students attending the institution, including those student organizations with off-campus housing facilities. “USCA/USMT has no off-campus student organizations or housing.”
    • A statement of policy regarding the possession, use, and sale of alcoholic beverages and enforcement of State underage drinking laws and a statement of policy regarding the possession, use, and sale of illegal drugs and enforcement of Federal and State drug laws and a description of any drug or alcohol abuse education programs as required under section 120 of this Act. “The policy for the possession, use and sale of alcoholic beverages and illegal drugs is as follows: USCA/USMT strictly prohibits the use and sale of alcoholic beverages and illegal drugs on its campus. USCA/USMT offers pamphlets on agencies that can help those addicted to alcohol or illegal drugs.”
    • A statement advising the campus community where law enforcement agency information provided by a State under section 170101(j) of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (42 U.S.C. 14071(j)), concerning registered sex offenders may be obtained, such as the law enforcement office of the institution, a local law enforcement agency with jurisdiction for the campus, or a computer network address.
      “The campus community may receive registered sex offender information by going to http://www.isp.state.il.us/sor/ “
    • A statement of current campus policies regarding immediate emergency response and evacuation procedures, including the use of electronic and cellular communication (if appropriate), which policies shall include procedures to-
      • immediately notify the campus community upon the confirmation of a significant emergency or dangerous situation involving an immediate threat to the health or safety of students or staff occurring on the campus, as defined in paragraph (6), unless issuing a notification will compromise efforts to contain the emergency;
      • publicize emergency response and evacuation procedures on an annual basis in a manner designed to reach students and staff; and
      • test emergency response and evacuation procedures on an annual basis.
        “USCA/USMT will immediately contact Emergency 911 on campus phones (or cell phones if campus phones are not functioning) and will follow 911 advise regarding the emergency. We will notify the campus community of an emergency by way of the intercom system. In the event the intercom system isn’t functioning, Admissions Staff will walk through the campus, notifying teachers and students of the emergency. This institution will, without delay, and taking into account the health and safety of the community determine the content of the notification and initiate this notification system, unless the notification will, in the professional judgment of responsible authorities, compromise efforts to assist victims or to contain, respond to, or otherwise mitigate the emergency. We will direct students and employees to safety. Amy Pruitt, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid, and Gail Lorenzini, School Owner, will be notified in addition to the police department. The procedure for disseminating emergency information to the larger community will be for the school owner, Gail Lorenzini, to communicate this information to police and based on their recommendation, to other agencies and media outlets as well. In addition to publishing this disclosure document, the school will also post several multi-colored pamphlets throughout the school stating specific required responses for each type of emergency. The school will test emergency response and evacuation procedures annually and document a description of the exercise as well as the date and time of the exercise and whether it was announced or unannounced.
        Reports should be made to:
        2913 West White Oaks Drive, main floor
        Director’s office or Business office
      • Phone 217-753-8990
  2. Nothing in this subsection shall be construed to authorize the Secretary to require particular policies, procedures, or practices by institutions of higher education with respect to campus crimes or campus security.
  3. Each institution participating in any program under this title, other than a foreign institution of higher education, shall make timely reports to the campus community on crimes considered to be a threat to other students and employees described in paragraph (1)(F) that are reported to campus security or local law police agencies. Such reports shall be provided to students and employees in a manner that is timely, that withholds the names of victims as confidential, and that will aid in the prevention of similar occurrences.
    “The procedure for making timely warning reports to members of the campus is as follows: Should there be a perceived threat, a memo will be issued by the Director of Admissions & Financial Aid and posted on the student bulletin boards and in the teacher’s lounge.”
    • Each institution participating in any program under this title, other than a foreign institution of higher education, that maintains a police or security department of any kind shall make, keep, and maintain a daily log, written in a form that can be easily understood, recording all crimes reported to such police or security department, including--
      • the nature, date, time, and general location of each crime; and
      • the disposition of the complaint, if known.
        “USCA/USMT does not maintain a police or security department.”
      • All entries that are required pursuant to this paragraph shall, except where disclosure of such information is prohibited by law or such disclosure would jeopardize the confidentiality of the victim, be open to public inspection within two business days of the initial report being made to the department or a campus security authority. “USCA/USMT does not maintain a police or security department.”
      • If new information about an entry into a log becomes available to a police or security department, then the new information shall be recorded in the log not later than two business days after the information becomes available to the police or security department.
      • If there is clear and convincing evidence that the release of such information would jeopardize an ongoing criminal investigation or the safety of an individual, cause a suspect to flee or evade detection, or result in the destruction of evidence, such information may be withheld until that damage is no longer likely to occur from the release of such information. “USCA/USMT does not maintain a police or security department.”
  4. On an annual basis, each institution participating in any program under this title, other than a foreign institution of higher education, shall submit to the Secretary a copy of the statistics required to be made available under paragraph (1)(F). The Secretary shall--
    • review such statistics and report to the authorizing committees on campus crime statistics by September 1, 2000; “USCA/USMT will collect statistics regarding campus crime beginning September 1st, 2000, and available for review by September 1st, 2001, and every August 1st thereafter, according to regulations.”
    • make copies of the statistics submitted to the Secretary available to the public; “USCA/USMT posts campus crime statistics annually in the break room for all students and staff to see and publishes these on the Clery Act website as well.” and
    • in coordination with representatives of institutions of higher education, identify exemplary campus security policies, procedures, and practices and disseminate information concerning those policies, procedures, and practices that have proven effective in the reduction of campus crime.
      Campus Safety Statistics: Statistics concerning the occurrence on campus of the following criminal offenses, reported to local police agencies and any school official that has significant responsibilities for student and campus activities: (i) (I) murder; (II) sex offenses, forcible or nonforcible; (III) robbery; (IV) aggravated assault; (V) burglary; (VI) motor vehicle theft; (VII) manslaughter; (VIII) arson; and (IX) arrests or persons referred for campus disciplinary action for liquor law violations, drug-related violations, and weapons possession; and (ii) of the crimes described in subclauses (I) through (VIII) of clause (i), of larceny-theft, simple assault, intimidation, and destruction, damage, or vandalism of property, and of other crimes involving bodily injury to any person, in which the victim is intentionally selected because of the actual or perceived race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, ethnicity, or disability of the victim that are reported to campus security authorities or local police agencies, which data shall be collected and reported according to category of prejudice.
      “None of the above have occurred or been reported for the period of January 1st, 2019, to December 31st, 2019.”
    • In this subsection:
      • (i) The term “dating violence”, “domestic violence”, and “stalking” have the meaning given such terms in section 40002(a) of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (42 U.S.C. 13925(a)).
      • (ii) The term "campus" means--
        • any building or property owned or controlled by an institution of higher education within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of the institution and used by the institution in direct support of, or in a manner related to, the institution's educational purposes, including residence halls; and
        • property within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of the institution that is owned by the institution but controlled by another person, is used by students, and supports institutional purposes (such as a food or other retail vendor).
      • The term "noncampus building or property" means--
        • any building or property owned or controlled by a student organization recognized by the institution; and
        • any building or property (other than a branch campus) owned or controlled by an institution of higher education that is used in direct support of, or in relation to, the institution's educational purposes, is used by students, and is not within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of the institution.
      • The term "public property" means all public property that is within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of the institution, such as a sidewalk, a street, other thoroughfare, or parking facility, and is adjacent to a facility owned or controlled by the institution if the facility is used by the institution in direct support of, or in a manner related to the institution's educational purposes.
      • The term “sexual assault” means an offense classified as a forcible or nonforcible sex offense under the uniform crime reporting system of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.
    • In cases where branch campuses of an institution of higher education, schools within an institution of higher education, or administrative divisions within an institution are not within a reasonably contiguous geographic area, such entities shall be considered separate campuses for purposes of the reporting requirements of this section.
  5. The statistics described in clauses (i) and (ii) of paragraph (1)(F) shall be compiled in accordance with the definitions used in the uniform crime reporting system of the Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation, and the modifications in such definitions as implemented pursuant to the Hate Crime Statistics Act. For the offenses of domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking, such statistics shall be compiled in accordance with the definitions used in section 40002(a) of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (42 U.S.C. 13925(a)). Such statistics shall not identify victims of crimes or persons accused of crimes.
    • Each institution of higher education participating in any program under this title and Title IV of the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964, other than a foreign institution of higher education, shall develop and distribute as part of the report described in paragraph (1) a statement of policy regarding--
      • such institution's programs, to prevent domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking; and
      • the procedures that such institution will follow once an incident of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking has been reported, including a statement of the standard evidence that will be used during any institutional conduct proceeding arising from such a report.
    • The policy described in subparagraph (A) shall address the following areas:
      • Education programs to promote the awareness of rape, acquaintance rape, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking, which include-
        • primary prevention and awareness programs for all incoming students and new employees, which shall include-.
          • aa. a statement that the institution of higher education prohibits the offenses of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking;
          • bb. the definition of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking in the applicable jurisdiction;
          • cc. the definition of consent, in reference to sexual activity, in the applicable jurisdiction;
          • dd. safe and positive options for bystander intervention that may be carried out by an individual to prevent harm or intervene when there is a risk of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking against a person other than such individual;
          • ee. information on risk reduction to recognize warning signs of abusive behavior and how to avoid potential attacks; and
          • ff. the information describe in clauses (ii) through (vii); and
        • ongoing prevention and awareness campaigns for students and faculty, including information described in items (aa) through (ff) of sub clause (I).
      • Possible sanctions or protective measures that such institution may impose following a final determination of an institutional disciplinary procedure regarding rape, acquaintance rape, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking.
      • Procedures victims should follow if a sex offense, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking has occurred, including information in writing about –
        • the importance of preserving evidence as may be necessary to the proof of criminal domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking, or in obtaining a protection order;
        • to whom the alleged offense should be reported;
        • options regarding law enforcement and campus authorities, including notification of the victim’s option to-
          • aa. notify proper law enforcement and campus authorities, including notification of the victim’s option to-
          • bb. be assisted by campus authorities in notifying law enforcement authorities if the victim so chooses; and
          • cc. decline to notify such authorities; and
        • where applicable, the rights of victims and the institution’s responsibilities regarding orders of protection, no contact orders, restraining orders, or similar lawful orders issued by a criminal, civil, or tribal court.
      • Procedures for institutional disciplinary action in cases of alleged domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking, which shall include a clear statement that--
        • such proceedings shall -
          • aa. provide a prompt, fair, and impartial investigation and resolution; and
          • bb. be conducted by officials who receive annual training on the issues related to domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assaults, and stalking and how to conduct an investigation and hearing process that protects the safety of victims and promotes accountability.
        • the accuser and the accused are entitled to the same opportunities to have others present during an institutional disciplinary proceeding, including the opportunity to be accompanied to any related meeting or proceeding by an advisor of their choice; and
        • both the accuser and the accused shall be simultaneously informed, in writing, of –
          • aa. the outcome of any institutional disciplinary proceeding that arises from an allegation of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking;
          • bb. the institution’s procedures for the accused and the victim to appeal the results of the institutional disciplinary proceeding;
          • cc. of any change to the results that occurs prior to the time that such results become final; and
          • dd. when such results become final.
      • (v) Information about how the institution will protect the confidentiality of victims, including how publicly-available record keeping will be accomplished without the inclusion of identifying information about the victim, to the extent permissible by law.
      • (vi) Written notification of students and employees about existing counseling, health, mental health, victim advocacy, legal assistance, and other services available for victims both on-campus and in the community.
      • (vii) Written notification of victims about options for, and available assistance in, changing academic, living, transportation, and working situations, if so requested by the victim and if such accommodations are reasonably available, regardless of whether the victim chooses to report the crime to campus police or local law enforcement.
    • (C) A student or employee who reports to an institution of higher education that the student or employee has been a victim of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking, whether the offense occurred on or off campus, shall be provided with a written explanation of the student or employee’s rights and options, as described in clauses (ii) through (vii) of subparagraph (B). “USCA/USMT’s policy for Sexual Assault Programs to prevent sex offenses and procedures to follow when a sex offense occurs is as follows: USCA/USMT annually hires professionals to come onto campus and educate students and staff about security awareness, crime prevention and sexual assault prevention. USCA/USMT also provides pamphlets of agencies that can assist a victim after an offense has occurred. Incidents should be reported to the School Director of Admissions & Financial Aid, Amy Pruitt, or the Title IX Coordinator, Instructor, Carolyn Black, as soon as possible. Reports should be made to:

      2913 West White Oaks Drive, main floor
      Director’s office or Business office
      Phone 217-753-8990

      Upon notification of an incident, USCA/USMT’s immediate response will be to call the appropriate medical or police agency, as has been determined to be needed. We will inform the victim to wait for medical or police personnel to arrive to preserve any evidence. Both the accuser and accused will be notified of the option to contact local law enforcement as well as be notified of options for counseling and changes in academic situations after the incident. The accuser and the accused are entitled to the same opportunities to have others present during a disciplinary hearing and both will be informed as to the outcome of any institutional disciplinary hearing. The opportunity to present witnesses and other evidence will be given. USCA/USMT will inform the student(s) involved of the status of the investigation on a periodic basis. The school will make a determination promptly, but no later than seven business days from the incident. An opportunity for appeal of the findings will be allowed. Any physical contact by a student to another student or staff that results in a complaint being filed with school management will be grounds for suspension from school for one week. USCA/USMT will make sure the harassed student(s) know how to report any subsequent problems and make follow-up inquiries to see if there have been any new incidents or any retaliation. A repeat of a similar incident, or any retaliation or intimidation will result in expulsion. USCA/USMT may also terminate a staff member’s employment if they are a party to the incident.”
  6. The Secretary, in consultation with the Attorney General of the United States, shall provide technical assistance in complying with the provisions of this section to an institution of higher education who requests such assistance.
  7. Nothing in this section shall be construed to require the reporting or disclosure of privileged information.
  8. The Secretary shall report to the appropriate committees of Congress each institution of higher education that the Secretary determines is not in compliance with the reporting requirements of this subsection.
  9. For purposes of reporting the statistics with respect to crimes described in paragraph (1)(F), an institution of higher education shall distinguish, by means of separate categories, any criminal offenses that occur--
    • (A) on campus;
    • (B) in or on a noncampus building or property;
    • (C) on public property; and
    • (D) in dormitories or other residential facilities for students on campus.
    “USCA/USMT provides this information as part of the annual Crime Statistics Table.”
  10. Upon a determination pursuant to section 487(c)(3)(B) [20 USCS § 1094(c)(3)(B)] that an institution of higher education has substantially misrepresented the number, location, or nature of the crimes required to be reported under this subsection, the Secretary shall impose a civil penalty upon the institution in the same amount and pursuant to the same procedures as a civil penalty is imposed under section 487(c)(3)(B) [20 USCS § 1094(c)(3)(B)].
    • (A) Nothing in this subsection may be construed to--
      • (i) create a cause of action against any institution of higher education or any employee of such an institution for any civil liability; or
      • (ii) establish any standard of care.
    • Notwithstanding any other provision of law, evidence regarding compliance or noncompliance with this subsection shall not be admissible as evidence in any proceeding of any court, agency, board, or other entity, except with respect to an action to enforce this subsection.
  11. The Secretary shall annually report to the authorizing committees regarding compliance with this subsection by institutions of higher education, including an up-to-date report on the Secretary's monitoring of such compliance.
    • The Secretary shall seek the advice and counsel of the Attorney General of the United States concerning the development, and dissemination to institutions of higher education, of best practices information about campus safety and emergencies.
    • (B) The Secretary shall seek the advice and counsel of the Attorney General of the United States and the Secretary of Health and Human Services concerning the development, and dissemination to institutions of higher education, of best practices information about preventing and responding to incidents of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking, including elements of institutional policies that have proven successful based on evidence-based outcome measurements.
  12. No officer, employee, or agent of an institution, participating in any program under this title to retaliate, intimidate, threaten, coerce, or otherwise discriminate against any individual for exercising their rights or responsibilities under any provision of this subsection.
  13. This subsection may be cited as the "Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act".

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USCA Crime Statistics Table - 2020
OFFENSE YEAR ON-CAMPUS PROPERTY RESIDENTIAL FACILITIES NON-CAMPUS PROPERTY PUBLIC PROPERTY REPORTED BY LOCAL POLICE TOTAL
MURDER/NON-NEGLIGENT MANSLAUGHTER 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0
NEGLIGENT MANSLAUGHTER 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0
SEX OFFENSES, FORCIBLE 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0
RAPE 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0
FONDLING 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0
SEX OFFENSES, NON-FORCIBLE 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0
INCEST 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0
STATUTORY RAPE 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0
ROBBERY 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0
AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0
BURGLARY 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0
ARSON 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0


USCA Crime Statistics Table - Hate Crimes - On Campus
OFFENSE YEAR RACE RELIGION SEXUAL ORIENTATION GENDER GENDER IDENTITY DISABILITY ETHNICITY NATIONAL ORIGIN
MURDER/NON-NEGLIGENT MANSLAUGHTER 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
RAPE 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
FONDLING 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
INCEST 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
STATUTORY RAPE 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
ROBBERY 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
BURGLARY 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
ARSON 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
SIMPLE ASSAULT 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
LARCENY-THEFT 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
INTIMIDATION 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
DESTRUCTION/DAMAGE/VANDALISM OF PROPERTY 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0


USCA Crime Statistics Table - Hate Crimes - Public Property
OFFENSE YEAR RACE RELIGION SEXUAL ORIENTATION GENDER GENDER IDENTITY DISABILITY ETHNICITY NATIONAL ORIGIN
MURDER 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
RAPE 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
FONDLING 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
INCEST 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
STATUTORY RAPE 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
ROBBERY 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
BURGLARY 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
ARSON 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
SIMPLE ASSAULT 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
LARCENY-THEFT 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
INTIMIDATION 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
DESTRUCTION/DAMAGE/VANDALISM OF PROPERTY 2020 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0


USCA Crime Statistics Table - VAWA Offenses
CRIME YEAR ON-CAMPUS PROPERTY RESIDENTIAL FACILITIES NON-CAMPUS PROPERTY PUBLIC PROPERTY REPORTED BY LOCAL POLICE
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE 2020          
2019          
2018 0 0 0 0 0
DATING VIOLENCE 2020          
2019          
2018 0 0 0 0 0
STALKING 2020          
2019          
2018 0 0 0 0 0


USCA Crime Statistics Table - Arrests
CRIME YEAR ON-CAMPUS PROPERTY RESIDENTIAL FACILITIES NON-CAMPUS PROPERTY PUBLIC PROPERTY REPORTED BY LOCAL POLICE
WEAPONS (Carrying, Possessing, Etc.) 2020 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0
DRUG ABUSE VIOLATIONS 2020 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0
LIQUOR LAW VIOLATIONS 2020 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0


USCA Crime Statistics Table - Disciplinary Actions
CRIME YEAR ON-CAMPUS PROPERTY RESIDENTIAL FACILITIES NON-CAMPUS PROPERTY PUBLIC PROPERTY REPORTED BY LOCAL POLICE
WEAPONS (Carrying, Possessing, Etc.) 2020 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0
DRUG ABUSE VIOLATIONS 2020 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0
LIQUOR LAW VIOLATIONS 2020 0 0 0 0 0
2019 0 0 0 0 0
2018 0 0 0 0 0


USCA Crime Statistics Table - VAWA Offenses
OFFENSE 2020 2019 2018
TOTAL UNFOUNDED CRIMES     0

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University of Spa and Cosmetology Arts and University of Spa and Massage Therapy is a drug-free campus.

Students and staff will receive an annual distribution of drug and alcohol abuse prevention literature describing the ill health effects and possible legal sanctions under state, federal and local laws. In addition, pamphlets are available in the restrooms. It is the policy of the school that the unlawful manufacture, distribution, possession or use of alcohol or illicit drugs is prohibited on this institution’s property. Counseling is also available to advise of treatment locations.

Any violations will be cause for dismissal, for employees and or students. In addition, if a student is convicted, during a period of enrollment for which the student was receiving Title IV, HEA program funds, under any federal or state law involving the possession or sale of illegal drugs, they will lose their eligibility for any Title IV, HEA grant, loan or work-study assistance.

The school will conduct a biennial review of this drug and alcohol abuse prevention program and that biennial review is available for the public to review. Below are the details of the last biennial review conducted:

Date conducted: 1-5-21

Effectiveness of program/needed changes: Program deemed effective/no changes needed Number of drug/alcohol-related violations and fatalities that occurred on campus or were reported to campus officials: None

Number and Type of Sanctions imposed: None

Were the sanctions consistently enforced: N/A

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Job Demand Survey 2007 – Results for Illinois

Since 1990, NACCAS has commissioned several Job Demand Surveys, to provide quantitative data on cosmetology careers, earnings potential, and job openings. The most recent survey, completed in May 2007, compiles data from 6,203 salons responding to a national survey.

The 2007 Job Demand Survey results indicate that salons in Illinois plan to hire 20,320 new employees in the next twelve months. The average annual salary for a salon professional in Illinois is $38,646. This amount does not include tips and gratuities. Nationally, the average salon professional’s salary is $35,973.

Most importantly, 72 percent of Illinois salon owners who attempted to hire new employees in 2006 said they were unable to find properly-trained applicants. This means that jobs would be immediately available for salon professionals.

Chart 1 – Percent of anticipated new hires by job category

Job Demand Survey Pie Chart

As of January 2007, there were 103,074 professionals employed at Illinois’s salons. 70 percent of salons in the state are employer-owned, and 13 percent are booth-rental salons. The other 17 percent are a combination of the two.

53 percent of Illinois salons are classified by their owners as full-service salons; 23 percent are listed as haircutting salons. Barbershops make up 9 percent of the total. Nationally, 58 percent of salons are listed as full-service, meaning that Illinois has a slightly higher percentage of specialized establishments.

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INFORMAL COMPLAINTS

USCA prefers to resolve all misunderstandings on an informal basis. When disagreements regarding school policies or procedures occur between students, between students and staff, or between staff members, the parties involved must try to resolve the problem amongst themselves. If a solution cannot be reached, or if the problem cannot be resolved then please consult the next higher authority. This means student problems can be taken to the instructor; student/staff disagreement can be taken to the school manager; staff conflicts can be taken to the school manager. The manager will bring all parties involved together to try and work out the problem.

FORMAL COMPLAINTS

If a satisfactory solution cannot be reached by informal discussion, students and/or staff members may file a written formal complaint with the appropriate director. Business Practice of financial Assistance complaints should be filed with the Director of Admissions & Financial Aid (Amy). All other problems should be filed with the Director of Operations (Jamie). The written complaint should contain specifics of the incident or problem and also a brief description of the steps already taken to resolve the problem. This should include names of persons with whom the problem has been discussed so the Director can interview these persons.

RESOLUTIONS

The Director will interview the parties involved and establish a hearing for the complaint. A record will be kept of the complaint filed, persons interviewed, and the outcome of the hearing. After viewing all aspects of the complaint, the Director will make a ruling based on the policies of the school, the regulations by which the school is bound, and the nature of the complaint. In all cases, the Director will make a decision that is fair and equitable to all concerned within the constraints listed above.

If the students or the staff has a problem with management, it can be solved only by discussing the problem with that manager.

FURTHER COMPLAINTS

If, after following the above procedures, the student of staff member feels that the school has not followed the regulations by which it is bound, that person may take the complaint to one of the following authorities and fill out their complaint form:

Illinois Department of Professional Regulations
State Postsecondary Review Entity
320 W. Washington
Springfield, IL 62786
217-785-0800

National Accrediting Commission of Career Arts & Sciences Inc. (NACCAS)
3015 Colvin Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
703-600-7600

Illinois Board of Higher Education
1 N Old Capitol Plaza, Suite 333
Springfield, Illinois 62701
217.782.2551
http://complaints.ibhe.org

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University of Spa & Cosmetology Arts (USCA) & University of Spa & Massage Therapy's (USMT) Discrimination & Sexual Harassment Policy

University of Spa & Cosmetology Arts (USCA) and University of Spa & Massage Therapy (USMT), in its admission, instruction, and graduation policies and practices, does not discriminate on the basis of sex, race, religion, age, ethnic origin, color, creed, disability, sexual orientation, ancestry, gender, gender identity or expression, or any other basis protected by the federal, state or local law. USCA/USMT does not allow or tolerate discrimination of any kind, bullying, harassment, or hazing of any sort. All students and staff are required to take the mandatory sexual harassment and prevention training upon starting in school and again in January of each year. If any student or employee experiences or witnesses anyone being bullied, harassed, or hazed in any way, he or she is required to report the matter to the Director of Operations (Jamie Kauffman) or Director of Admissions and Financial Aid (Amy Pruitt) in person, by phone, or by mail immediately so appropriate action can be taken. Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 prohibits sex discrimination and sexual harassment in schools. Preventing and remedying harassment is essential to ensure a nondiscriminatory, safe environment in which students can learn.

The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act (Clery Act) requires educational institutions to prohibit offenses of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking.

Eliminating discrimination or harassment of any kind is a high priority. USCA/USMT will respond to any student or employee who reports an incident. If any discrimination or harassment complaints are made USCA/USMT finds it important to act upon the complaints promptly, effectively, and discreetly to resolve the issue. USCA/USMT will also limit or prevent public disclosure of the names of both the party who alleges discrimination or harassment and the name of the alleged harasser except to the extent necessary to carry out a thorough investigation.

Any employee or student who violates this policy will be subject to disciplinary action. As part of the school’s commitment to providing a harassment-free environment this policy will be published to students and staff through the school’s website, student orientations, staff meetings and other various forms of communication.

Title IX Coordinator

USCA/USMT’s Title IX Coordinator has the responsibility to oversee and support all Title IX activities, complaints and investigations. The Title IX Coordinator is Carolyn Black (Instructor) and below is the contact information for the Title IV Coordinator:

University of Spa & Cosmetology Arts
Attn: Title IX Coordinator
2913 W White Oaks Dr
Springfield, Illinois 62704
217.753.8990
black@uscart.com

DEFINITIONS

Sex Discrimination

Sex discrimination means treating an individual or group unfavorably than another based upon the sex or gender of that individual or group with regard to any aspect of services, benefits or opportunities provided by the school, such as: For students, it involves conduct or statements that deny the student(s) an equal opportunity to fully benefit from the school’s program and activities. For employees, it involves conduct or statements that deny the employee(s) an equal opportunity in employment.

Sexual Harassment

A fellow classmate, employee of the school, or patron of USCA/USMT explicitly or implicitly conditions a student’s participation in an education program or activity or bases an educational decision on the student’s submission to unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, or other verbal, nonverbal, or physical conduct of a sexual nature that is sufficiently severe, persistent, or pervasive to limit a student’s ability to participate in or benefit from an education program or activity, or to create a hostile or abusive educational environment. It is unlawful whether the student resists and suffers the threatened harm or submits and thus avoids the threatened harm. These acts may be committed by an individual or a group.

Gender-based harassment, which may include acts of verbal, nonverbal, or physical aggression, intimidation, or hostility based on sex, but not involving conduct of a sexual nature if sufficiently severe, persistent, or pervasive and directed at individuals because of their sex, may be considered sexual harassment.

Sexual harassment is NOT a hug from a teacher, administrator, client or fellow student to comfort or congratulate, or a demonstration of a teaching technique requiring contact with another student/teacher unless these activities take on a sexual connotation and rise to the level of sexual harassment.

In order for the actions to be actionable as harassment, sexual conduct must be unwelcome. Conduct is unwelcome if the student did not request or invite it and “regarded the conduct as undesirable or offensive,” having accepted the conduct does not mean a person welcomed it; i.e., A person may not file a complaint out of fear, or concern that the objections might cause the harasser(s) to make more comments. Also, the fact that a student willingly participated in conduct on one occasion does not prevent them from indicating that the same conduct has become unwelcome on a subsequent occasion.

Sexual Assault

Sexual assault is defined as an offense classified as a forcible or nonforcible sex offense under the uniform crime reporting system of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Sexual assault occurs when a physical sexual activity is engaged in without the consent of the other person or when the other person is unable to consent to the activity. The activity or conduct may include physical force, violence, threat, or intimidation, ignoring the objections of the other person, causing the other person’s intoxication or incapacitation through the use of drugs or alcohol, and taking advantage of the other person’s incapacitation (including voluntary intoxication).

Sexual Violence

Sexual violence is defined as physical sexual acts engaged in without the consent of the other person or when the other person is unable to consent to the activity. Sexual violence includes sexual assault, rape, battery, and sexual coercion; domestic violent, dating violence and stalking.

Domestic Violence

A felony or misdemeanor crime of violence committed by:

  • A current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim
  • A person with who a victim shares a child in common
  • A person who is living with or has lived with the victim as a spouse or partner
  • A person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which this policy applies, or
  • Any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which this policy applies
Dating Violence

Dating violence means violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim; and where the existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the following factors:

  • The length of the relationship
  • The type of relationship
  • The frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship

Dating violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse.

Stalking

Stalking means engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to:

  • Fear for his or her safety or the safety of others; or
  • Suffer substantial emotional distress.
General Definitions

Actual knowledge means notice of sexual harassment or allegations of sexual harassment to a recipient’s Title IX Coordinator or any official of the recipient who has authority to institute corrective measures on behalf of the recipient.

Campus is defined as any building or property owned or controlled by an institution of higher education within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of the institution and used by the institution in direct support of, or in a manner related to, the institution’s educational purposes, including residence halls; and property within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of the institution that is owned by the institution but controlled by another person, is used by students, and supports institutional purposes (such as a food or other retail vendor). Education programs or activities that receive Federal financial assistance. Under the Final Rule, schools must respond when sexual harassment occurs in the school’s education program or activity, against a person.

Complainant is defined as an individual who is alleged to be the victim of conduct that could constitute sexual harassment. Any third-party, as well as the complainant, may report sexual harassment. While parents and guardians do not become complainants (or respondents); however, the school recognizes the legal rights of parents and guardians to act on behalf of parties (including by filing formal complaints) in Title IX matters.

Consent is informed, voluntary, and revocable. Consent is an affirmative, unambiguous, and conscious decision by each participant to engage in mutually agreed-upon sexual activity. It must be given without coercion, force, threats, or intimidation. Consent must be ongoing throughout a sexual encounter and can be revoked at any time. Once consent is withdrawn, the sexual activity must stop immediately.

Corrective measures are defined as actions taken to address a security breach or privacy violation, with the intent to counteract the breach or violation and reduce future risks. The school’s owner and School Director are the school’s designated officials who have the authority to institute corrective measures.

Formal complaint is defined as a document filed by a complainant or signed by the Title IX Coordinator alleging sexual harassment against a respondent and requesting that the school investigate the allegation of sexual harassment.

Non-campus building or property is defined as any building or property owned or controlled by a student organization recognized by the institution; and any building or property (other than a branch campus) owned or controlled by an institution of higher education that is used in direct support of, or in relation to, the institution’s educational purposes, is used by students, and is not within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of the institution. Educational programs or activities, whether such programs or activities occur on-campus or off-campus. A school may address sexual harassment affecting its students or employees that falls outside Title IX’s jurisdiction in any manner the school chooses, including providing supportive measures or pursuing discipline.

Public property is defined as all public property that is within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of the institution, such as a sidewalk, a street, other thoroughfare, or parking facility, and is adjacent to a facility owned or controlled by the institution if the facility is used by the institution in direct support of, or in a manner related to the institution’s educational purposes.

Respondent is defined as an individual who has been reported to be the perpetrator of conduct that could constitute sexual harassment.

Supportive measures are defined as individualized services reasonably available that are non-punitive, non-disciplinary, and not unreasonably burdensome to the other party while designed to ensure equal educational access, protect safety, or deter sexual harassment.

Rape Shield Protections limit or prohibit the use of evidence of a victim’s past sexual history to undermine that victim’s credibility. The purpose of rape shield laws is to protect victims from the emotional distress of being cross-examined about their sexual history on the witness stand. Evidence regarding the victim’s reputation and evidence of past sexual behavior not related to the rape accusation at hand is prohibited.

Prohibited Conduct

Title IX protects students’ rights to educational opportunities free from sex discrimination. This policy strictly prohibits sexual or other unlawful harassment or discrimination, as well as sexual violence, dating violence, domestic violence and stalking, as defined above. Sexual or other unlawful harassment or discrimination that includes any verbal, physical, or visual conduct, racial epithets, slurs and derogatory remarks, stereotypes, jokes, posters or cartoons based on race, religion, creed, color, national origin, ancestry, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions), military or veteran status, physical or mental disability, medical condition, marital status, age, sexual orientation, gender, gender identity or expression, genetic information, or any other basis protected by the federal, state, or local law basis if:

  • Submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual’s education or employment; An employee of the recipient conditioning the provision of an aid, benefit, or service of the recipient on an individual’s participation in unwelcome sexual conduct (quid pro quo);
  • Submission to, or rejection of, such conduct by an individual is used as a basis for decisions concerning that individual’s education or employment; or
  • Unwelcome conduct determined by a reasonable person to be so severe, pervasive, and objectively offensive that it effectively denies a person equal access to the recipient’s education program or activity. It creates a hostile or offensive environment, which means the alleged conduct is sufficiently serious to limit or deny a student or student’s ability to participate or benefit from the student’s education program.
  • Sexual harassment is conduct based on sex, whether directed toward a person of the opposite or same sex, and may include explicit sexual propositions, sexual innuendo, suggestive comments, sexually oriented “kidding” or “teasing,” practical jokes, jokes about or displays of obscene printed or visual material, questions about sexual fantasies, preferences, or history, and physical contact, such as patting, pinching, or intentionally brushing against another person’s body. Gender-based harassment, including acts of verbal, nonverbal, or physical aggression, intimidation, or hostility based on sex or sex-stereotyping are strictly prohibited, even if those acts do not involve conduct of a sexual nature.

Title IX Reports & Complaint/Grievance Procedure

Complaint/Grievance Procedure

The following grievance procedures shall be used to address sex discrimination complaints filed by students/ employees or complaints filed on their behalf against employees, other students, or third parties.

Any person may report sex discrimination, including sexual harassment (whether or not the person reporting is the person alleged to be the victim of conduct that could constitute sex discrimination or sexual harassment), in person, by mail, by telephone, or by e-mail, using the contact information listed for the Title IX Coordinator, or by any other means that results in the Title IX Coordinator receiving the person’s verbal or written report. Such a report may be made at any time, including during non-business hours, by using the telephone number or e-mail address, or by mail to the office address, listed below for the Title IX Coordinator. Only a complainant may file a formal complaint that initiates a Title IX grievance procedure.

If you believe that you have experienced or witnessed harassment or sexual violence, you need to notify the Title IX coordinator as soon as possible after the incident. Do not allow an inappropriate situation to continue by not reporting it, regardless of who is creating the situation. No employee, contract worker, student, vendor, customer or service guest, or other person who does business with the school is exempt from the prohibitions in this policy. The Director of Operations or the Director of Admissions & Financial Aid, if they are informed of a Title IX complaint will refer all harassment complaints to the Title IX coordinator. In order to facilitate the investigation, your complaint should include details of the incident or incidents, dates and times, names of the individuals involved, and names of any witnesses. A sex discrimination complaint should be filed within seven (7) days from the date of the alleged discriminatory incident in order for the school to take timely and appropriate action. All documentation pertaining to the complaint/grievance process will be confidential. The complaint/ grievance once received will be maintained in the Title IX Coordinator’s office, which has limited staff access.

All complaints involving a student, employee, contract worker, vendor, customer or service guest, or other person who does business with the school will be referred to the campus’s Title IX Coordinator to begin the complaint process outline in this policy. The Title IX Coordinator is listed below and has the responsibility of Intake reports and complaints, initiating the formal complaint process, and providing supportive measures to both the complainant and respondent.

If the school has actual knowledge of sexual harassment in an educational program or activity at the school, against a person in the United States, they will respond promptly in a manner that is not deliberately indifferent. A school is considered deliberately indifferent only if its response to sexual harassment is clearly unreasonable in light of the known circumstances.

The school ensures that its Title IX Coordinator(s), Investigator(s), Decision-Maker(s), and Informal Resolution Facilitator(s) have adequate training on what constitutes sexual harassment, including sexual violence, dating violence, domestic violence, sex discrimination, and stalking, and that they understand how the school’s grievance procedures operate. Please refer to the end of this policy for a listing of the various roles of individuals involved in the Title IX process, their responsibilities, and training requirements.

Reporters

We encourage all individuals who have a Title IX compliant to meet with the Title IX Coordinator to begin the formal grievance process. If the Director of Operations or Director of Admissions & Financial Aid, who are not Title IX Coordinators, are informed of a Title IX complaint they must notify the Title IX Coordinator of the complaint immediately, as long as they have the Complainant’s consent that they can report the incident to the Title IX Coordinator. These are the only school employees that a complainant may discuss Title IX allegations with that are required under the school’s policy to be obligated to inform the Title IX Coordinator of information that they received, as long as the Complainant grants that authority. Once any of these reports are notified of complaint allegations the notice triggers the start of the complaint process by the Title IX Coordinator.

Formal Complaint

A “formal complaint” is defined as a document filed by a complainant or signed by the Title IX Coordinator alleging sexual harassment against a respondent and requesting that the school investigate the allegation of sexual harassment. At the time of filing a formal complaint, a complainant must be participating in or attempting to participate in the education program or activity of the school. A formal complaint may be filed with the school’s Title IX Coordinator in person, by mail, or by electronic mail, by using the contact information located in the school’s policy. The phrase “document filed by a complainant” means a document or electronic submission that contains the complainant’s physical or digital signature, or otherwise indicates that the complainant is the person filing the formal complaint.

The Title IX Coordinator will meet with the complainant to explain the process of filing a formal complaint. The complainant must be the alleged victim unless the parent or legal guardian has a legal right to act on their behalf. Anyone may report a Title IX violation; however, only a complainant may file a formal complaint that initiates a Title IX grievance procedure. The Title IX Coordinator will defer to the complainant’s wishes as to whether or not they want to file a formal complaint.

If the Title IX Coordinator is the one who signs and initiates a formal complaint, the Title IX Coordinator is not a complainant or a party during a grievance process and must comply with requirements for Title IX personnel to be free from conflicts of interest and bias.

The school’s Title IX Policy provides for a consistent, transparent grievance process for resolving formal complaints of sexual harassment. The school’s policy is required to treat complainants equitably by providing remedies any time a respondent is found responsible and treat respondents equitably by not imposing disciplinary sanctions without following the grievance process prescribed in the school’s policy. Any remedies, which are required to be provided to a complainant when a respondent is found responsible, will be designed to maintain the complainant’s equal access to education and may include the same individualized services described as supportive measures; however, any remedies imposed do not need to be non-disciplinary or non-punitive and need not avoid burdening the respondent.

Once a formal complaint has been filed, the school will provide a written notice to each of the parties involved, which will include a copy of the school’s written Grievance Process, a list of the allegations, including specific information regarding the allegations, and a notice that the parties have a right to an advisor. The advisor should not be a lawyer. If during the investigation additional allegations are investigated, then a new notice must be provided to the parties, which identifies the new issues.

Grievance Procedure

The school’s grievance procedures are designed to ensure that the Title IX complaint process is free from conflicts of interest and to treat everyone equally during the process, which requires Title IX personnel (Title IX Coordinators, Investigators, Decision-Makers, and people who facilitate any informal resolution process) to be free from conflicts of interest or bias for or against complainants or respondents. In order to accomplish this, we have put into place the following requirements.

  • All Title IX personnel must include training on the definition of sexual harassment, the scope of the school’s education program or activity, how to conduct an investigation and grievance process including hearings, appeals, and informal resolution processes, as applicable, and how to serve impartially, including by avoiding prejudgment of the facts at issue, conflicts of interest, and bias.
  • The school provides all decision-makers with training on any technology to be used at a live hearing. In addition, the school’s decision-makers and investigators receive training on issues of relevance, including how to apply the rape shield protections provided (only for complainants), prior to participating in any Title IX investigation.
  • The federal regulations governing Title IX allegations requires that there is a presumption that the respondent is not responsible for the alleged conduct until a determination regarding responsibility is made at the conclusion of the grievance process. The school may remove a respondent from the recipient’s educational program or activity on an emergency basis, provided that the school undertakes an individualized safety and risk analysis, and determines that an immediate threat to the physical health or safety of any student or other individual arising from the allegations of sexual harassment justifies removal and provides the respondent with notice and an opportunity to challenge the decision immediately following the removal. In the case of a school employee, the school may place the individual on mandatory administrative leave.
  • All of the materials the school uses to train Title IX personnel are located on the school’s website under the Required Disclosures section on the home page.
  • Once the hearing takes place, the Decision-Maker may take the following actions against the respondent: dismiss the complaint; place the individual on probation; suspend the individual; terminate the individual; require the individual to go to counseling; change the respondent’s schedule; or require the individual to retake the Title IX training.
  • The school may provide the following remedies to a complainant: an escort; removal from shared classes; academic support services, such as tutoring; and medical or counseling services.
  • The school has chosen to use the preponderance of the evidence standard, for all formal complaints of sexual harassment (including where employees and faculty are respondents).
  • Upon completion of the Title IX process, either party may file an appeal of the decision. The school’s appeal process is outlined below.
  • Throughout the grievance process the school will not use, rely on, or seek disclosure of information protected under a legally recognized privilege, unless the person holding such privilege has waived the privilege.
  • All provisions, rules, or practices that are a part of the school’s grievance process for handling formal complaints of sexual harassment apply equally to both parties.

To initiate a criminal investigation, reports of sexual violence should be made to “911” or local law enforcement. The criminal process is separate from the school’s disciplinary process. To the extent that an employee or contract worker is not satisfied with the school’s handling of a harassment or discrimination complaint, he or she may also contact the appropriate state or federal enforcement agency for legal relief.

The school will make appropriate referrals to law enforcement. The school will also notify complainants of the right to proceed with a criminal investigation and a Title IX complaint simultaneously. The school will not wait for the criminal investigation or criminal proceeding to be concluded before beginning its own investigation.

Investigation of Allegations

In response to all complaints, the school will ensure prompt and equitable resolution through a reliable and impartial investigation of the allegations, including the opportunity for both parties to present witnesses or other evidence. The school will follow its written grievance process before the imposition of any disciplinary sanctions or other actions that are not supportive measures, against a respondent. During this process the school will not restrict an individual’s rights protected under the U.S. Constitution, including the First Amendment, Fifth Amendment, and Fourteenth Amendment, when complying with Title IX.

The federal regulations require a school to investigate sexual harassment allegations in any formal complaint, which can be filed by a complainant, or signed by a Title IX Coordinator. The regulations affirm that a complainant’s wishes with respect to whether the school investigates should be respected unless the Title IX Coordinator determines that signing a formal complaint to initiate an investigation over the wishes of the complainant is not clearly unreasonable in light of the known circumstances.

If the allegations in a formal complaint do not meet the definition of sexual harassment, or did not occur in the school’s education program or activity against a person in the United States, the school must dismiss such allegations for purposes of Title IX but may still address the allegations in any manner the school deems appropriate under the school’s own code of conduct, which is published in the school’s catalog. The school may also dismiss a complaint if: the complainant withdraws the complaint; if the respondent is no longer enrolled or employed at the school; or if circumstances prevent institution from being able to investigate the complaint allegations. In this case, each party needs to be notified that the complaint has been dismissed and the reasons why it has been dismissed.

The time necessary to conduct an investigation will vary based on complexity of the allegation but will generally be completed within sixty (60) days of receipt of the complaint, which includes appeals and informal resolutions, with an allowance for short-term and good cause delays or extensions of the time frame. If a complainant requests confidentiality, the school will take all reasonable steps to investigate and respond to the complaint consistent with the request. If a complainant insists that his or her name or other identifiable information not be disclosed to the alleged perpetrator, the school will inform the complainant that its ability to respond may be limited.

The preponderance of the evidence standard will apply to investigations, meaning the school will evaluate whether it is more likely than not that the alleged conduct occurred.

During the investigation, the school will provide interim measures, as necessary, to protect the safety and well-being of students and/or employees involved and are designed to restore or preserve equal access to the education program or activity without unreasonably burdening the other party and to protect the safety of all parties, the school’s educational environment, or deter sexual harassment.

The Title IX Coordinator will promptly contact the complainant confidentially to discuss the availability of supportive measures; consider the complainant’s wishes with respect to supportive measures; inform the complainant of the availability of supportive measures with or without the filing of a formal complaint; and explain to the complainant the process for filing a formal complaint. The school will offer supportive measures, at no cost, to the person alleged to be the victim (referred to as the “complainant”), which may include counseling, extensions of deadlines or other course-related adjustments, modifications of work or class schedules, campus escort services, mutual restrictions on contact between the parties, leaves of absence, increased security and monitoring of certain areas of the campus, and other similar measures to help protect the alleged victim and deter sexual harassment. The respondent is also eligible for the same supportive measures that the complainant has available. The school will maintain as confidential any supportive measures provided to the complainant or respondent, to the extent that maintaining such confidentiality would not impair the ability of the school to provide the supportive measures. The school’s Title IX Coordinator is responsible for coordinating the effective implementation of all supportive measures that will be provided before sanctions in any grievance procedure are imposed.

The school will investigate the allegations in any formal complaint and send written notice to both parties (complainants and respondents) of the allegations upon receipt of a formal complaint. The Title IX Coordinator has the responsibility of investigating the complaint allegations; however, if it is in the best interest of the parties involved the school may choose another employee or hire a third-party to conduct the investigation.

During the grievance process, and when investigating the complaint allegations, the school will abide by the following procedures:

The school will apply a presumption that the respondent is not responsible during the grievance process (presumption of innocence). The burden of gathering evidence and burden of proof is the responsibility of the school, not on the individual parties.

The school will provide equal opportunity for the parties involved to present fact and expert witnesses and other inculpatory and exculpatory evidence. Witnesses cannot be anonymous.

The school will not restrict the ability of the parties to discuss the allegations or gather evidence (e.g., no “gag orders”) to support their case.

Both parties to the complaint will have the same opportunity to select an advisor of the party’s choice who may be, but need not be, an attorney.

The school as a part of the investigative process will send written notice of any investigative interviews, meetings, or hearings to both parties. Any interviews that occur can have both parties’ advisors present.

The schools will send the parties, and their advisors, evidence directly related to the allegations, in electronic format or hard copy, with at least 10 days for the parties to inspect, review, and respond to the evidenc proe vided.

The school may, in their discretion, dismiss a formal complaint or allegations therein if the complainant informs the Title IX Coordinator in writing that the complainant desires to withdraw the formal complaint or allegations therein, if the respondent is no longer enrolled or employed by the school, or if specific circumstances prevent the school from gathering sufficient evidence to reach a determination.

The school will give the parties written notice of a dismissal (mandatory or discretionary) and the reasons for the dismissal.

The school may, in their discretion, consolidate formal complaints where the allegations arise out of the same facts or circumstances, whether it is complaints against multiple respondents or by multiple complainants.

The school will protect the privacy of a party’s medical, psychological, and similar treatment records by stating that the school cannot access or use such records unless the school obtains the party’s voluntary, written consent to do so.

Live Hearings

The school’s Title IX grievance process provides for a live hearing. If the complaint goes to a live hearing, then each party must have an advisor. The appointed Decision-Maker is the individual who will be conducting the hearing. The following conditions will apply for a live hearing:

The school will send the parties, and their advisors, an investigative report that fairly summarizes relevant evidence, in electronic format or hard copy, with at least 10 days for the parties to respond to the report.

The school will dismiss allegations of conduct that do not meet the definition of sexual harassment or did not occur in a school’s educational program or activity against a person in the U.S. Such dismissal is only for Title IX purposes and does not preclude the school from addressing the conduct in any manner the school deems appropriate.

The Decision-Maker(s) must permit each party’s advisor to ask the other party and any witnesses all relevant questions and follow-up questions, including those that challenge credibility.

Cross-examination at the live hearing must be conducted directly, orally, and in real time by the party’s advisor of choice and never by either the complainant or respondent personally.

At the request of either party, the school will provide for the entire live hearing (including cross-examination) to occur with the parties located in separate rooms with technology enabling the parties to see and hear each other.

Only relevant cross-examination and other questions may be asked of a party or witness. Before a complainant, respondent, or witness answers a cross-examination or other question, the Decision-Maker must first determine whether the question is relevant and explain to the party’s advisor asking cross-examination questions any decision to exclude a question as not relevant.

The live hearing provides for the opportunity for all parties’ advisors to examine and cross-examine witnesses, including challenging the credibility of witnesses. Hearsay statements and irrelevant information is are not permitted.

The school’s process provides for rape shield protections for complainants deeming irrelevant questions and evidence about a complainant’s prior sexual behavior unless offered to prove that someone other than the respondent committed the alleged misconduct or offered to prove consent.

If either party does not have an advisor present at the live hearing, the school will provide, at no cost to that party, an advisor of the school’s choice who may be, but is not required to be, an attorney to conduct cross- examination on behalf of that party. Only the advisor may cross-examine the witnesses.

If a party or witness does not submit to cross-examination at the live hearing, the Decision-Maker(s) must not rely on any statement of that party or witness in reaching a determination regarding responsibility; provided, however, that the decision-maker(s) cannot draw an inference about the determination regarding responsibility based solely on a party’s or witness’s absence from the live hearing or refusal to answer cross-examination or other questions.

Live hearings may be conducted with all parties physically present in the same geographic location or, at the school’s discretion, any or all parties, witnesses, and other participants may appear at the live hearing virtually.

As a part of the process, the school will create an audio or audiovisual recording, or transcript, of any live hearing, as a part of the record.

Final Determination of Investigation

The school’s grievance process uses the preponderance of the evidence standard to determine responsibility. The school’s grievance process uses the same standard of evidence for all formal complaints of sexual harassment whether the respondent is a student or an employee (including faculty member). The Decision-Maker(s) in the process are required to objectively evaluate all relevant evidence, inculpatory and exculpatory, and avoid credibility determinations based on a person’s status as a complainant, respondent, or witness.

The Decision-Maker in all instances cannot be the Title IX Coordinator or the investigator in order to ensure that the investigative process is fair and free of bias. The Decision-Maker will issue a written determination regarding responsibility with findings of fact to include the following:

  • Must identify the standard of evidence used based on the school’s written policy.
  • Identify the allegations that constitute sexual harassment.
  • Describe the procedures the school used from the filing of the formal complaint through the hearing process.
  • Make findings of fact and conclusions about whether the alleged conduct occurred, rationale for the result as to each allegation.
  • Include the imposition of any sanctions or disciplinary actions imposed on the respondent, and whether any remedies will be provided to the complainant.
  • State the procedures to file an appeal and the allowable bases for an individual to appeal the decision.
  • Upon conclusion the written determination will be sent simultaneously to the parties.
  • The Title IX Coordinator is responsible for implementation of any remedies imposed by the Decision-Maker.
Appeal Process

The school will allow either or both parties the opportunity to appeal the Decision-Maker’s determination regarding responsibility from a school’s dismissal of a formal complaint or any allegations therein. Either party can appeal based on the following:

  • Procedural irregularity that affected the outcome of the matter;
  • Newly discovered evidence that could affect the outcome of the matter; and/or
  • The Title IX personnel had a conflict of interest or bias, that affected the outcome of the decision.
Informal Resolution

The school provides the opportunity for the parties involved in the formal complaint allegations to facilitate an informal resolution, such as mediation, so long as both parties give voluntary, informed, written consent to attempt an informal resolution. At any time prior to agreeing to a resolution, any party has the right to withdraw from the informal resolution process and resume the grievance process with respect to the formal complaint. The school will provide written notice to the parties of the allegations, requirements of the resolution process, and any limitations.

If the complaint allegations are in regard to an employee of the school sexually harassing a student, the opportunity for an informal resolution is not available.

A school may not require as a condition of enrollment or continuing enrollment, or employment or continuing employment, or enjoyment of any other right, waiver of the right to a formal investigation and adjudication of formal complaints of sexual harassment. Similarly, a school may not require the parties to participate in an informal resolution process and may not offer an informal resolution process unless a formal complaint is filed.

Retaliation Prohibited

The school prohibits any form of retaliation, intimidation, threats, coercion, discrimination, or harassment against any individual who filed or otherwise participated in the filing or investigation of a complaint of discrimination. Actions do not have to be on the basis of sex or involve sexual harassment to constitution retaliation. Retaliation complaints may use the same grievance process as sexual harassment complaints. Any individual who believes he or she has been subjected to retaliation may file a separate complaint under this procedure. The school will keep confidential the identity of complainants, respondents, and witnesses, except as may be permitted by FERPA, as required by law, or as necessary to carry out a Title IX proceeding, which does not constitute retaliation.

The following circumstances do not constitute retaliation, including:

  • Exercising one’s rights protected under the First Amendment.
  • Charging an individual with a code of conduct violation for making a materially false statement in bad faith in the course of a Title IX grievance proceeding does not constitute retaliation; however, a determination regarding responsibility, alone, is not sufficient to conclude that any party made a bad faith materially false statement.
  • Charging an individual with code of conduct violations that do not involve sexual harassment but arise out of the same facts or circumstances as a report or formal complaint of sexual harassment; however, for the purpose of interfering with any right or privilege secured by Title IX does constitute retaliation.
Reporting Requirements

Victims of sexual misconduct should be aware that school administrators must issue timely warnings for incidents reported to them that pose a substantial threat of bodily harm or danger to other members of the campus community. The school will make every effort to ensure that a victim’s name and other identifying information is not disclosed, while still providing enough information for community members to make safety decisions in light of the danger. The school reserves the right to notify parents/guardians of dependent students regarding any health or safety risk or a change in student status. The school will also notify the local police department of any crimes that have been brought to their attention.

Any allegations or violations of Title IX will be reported to the school’s Clery Act coordinator to be included in the school’s annual reporting requirements.

Record Keeping

All records of the Title IX formal complaint including, the investigation, evidence, decision making process, hearings, and decision letters will be maintained by the school for at least 7 years.

Required Training

The school’s Title IX Coordinator, Investigator, Decision-Maker, or any person designated by the school to facilitate an informal resolution process, must not have a conflict of interest or bias for or against complainants or respondents generally, or an individual complainant or respondent. Each individual that is part of the Title IX process is required to take training that includes how to serve impartially, including by avoiding prejudgment of the facts at issue, conflicts of interest, and bias. Part of the required training is to ensure that Title IX Coordinators, investigators, decision-makers, and any person who facilitates an informal resolution process, receive training on the definition of sexual harassment, the scope of the school’s education program or activity, how to serve impartially, how to make relevancy determinations, how to conduct an investigation and grievance process including hearings, appeals and informal resolution.

The school will provide the Decision-Maker(s) with training on any technology to be used at a live hearing and on issues of relevance of questions and evidence, including when questions and evidence about the complainant’s sexual predisposition or prior sexual behavior are not relevant. The school will also ensure that investigators receive training on issues of relevance to create an investigative report that fairly summarizes relevant evidence. Any materials used to train Title IX Coordinators, Investigators, Decision-Makers, and any person who facilitates an informal resolution process, must not rely on sex stereotypes and must promote impartial investigations and adjudications of formal complaints of sexual harassment.

Additional Information

Employees and students may contact the Title IX coordinator with any questions related to this policy. In addition, the U.S. Department of Education Office for Civil Rights (“OCR”) investigates complaints of unlawful harassment of students in educational programs or activities. This agency may serve as a neutral fact finder and will attempt to facilitate the voluntary resolution of disputes with the parties. For more information, visit the OCR website at: http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/index.html.